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Tagged "tariffs"

October 21, 2020

U.S. International Trade Commission decides no on further duties for Chinese glass products

The U.S. International Trade Commission found on October 20, 2020 that no U.S. industry is materially injured by imports of glass containers from China. This is counter to what was determined in September by the U.S. Department of Commerce, however, both organizations must agree that imports are injuring the domestic industry in order for duties to go into effect.

As a result of the Commission’s negative determination, no further anti dumping duty will be applied or countervailing duty deposits required for imports of glass containers from China, and importers will receive refunds of the deposits that they have previously paid.

September 28, 2020

Potential anti-dumping duty for Chinese glass products

A new anti-dumping duty (ADD) is being considered for most glass items brought into the US from China. The items covered under the proposed ADD are glass bottles and jars that hold from 2 fluid ounces up to 1 gallon. 

The tariff would vary across industries and some manufacturers will be granted reduced rates, however the vast majority of factories affected would be subject to a rate of up to 256%.

In September 2019 a petition was filed by The American Glass Packaging Coalition claiming that manufacturers in China are receiving subsidies from the Chinese government.

On September 14, 2020, the U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) made its final determination in favor of the new ADD, however in order for tariffs to be imposed, both the DOC and the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) must agree that imports of glass containers from China are injuring the domestic industry.

The ITC is currently scheduled to make its final determination in the anti-dumping duties investigation by October 26, 2020. If decided in favor of the new ADD, an anti-dumping order will be issued by November 2, 2020.

The ITC has not provided any indication of how they will rule in this determination, however on June 9, 2020, in a countervailing investigation, the ITC decided against a new ADD.

October 11, 2019

An increase from the 25% tariffs implemented on May 10, 2019 to 30% has been delayed several times, and was suspended today. This tariff increase would affect the majority of packaging products shipped from China, including plastic bags, cotton bags and corrugated boxes.

August 30, 2019

The previously announced tariffs scheduled for September 1, 2019 have been increased from 10% to 15%. The affected categories available through Lumi fall under HTS categories 4901 and 4902 which covers publications (magazines, newspapers, booklets, books). These products have strong coverage across the Lumi Network, if you need help moving production to navigate these tariffs please reach out to your Lumi team.

August 19, 2019

A new 10% tariff is due to take effect on September 1, 2019. The list of affected products has been updated on August 13th by the USTR. As of this writing, the affected categories available through Lumi fall under HTS categories 4901 and 4902 which covers publications (magazines, newspapers, booklets, books).

May 10, 2019

The tariff increase of 25% has officially gone into effect today.

Products which were impacted by the 10% increase last year will be increased by an additional 15%, and new products impacted by the tariffs will increase by the full 25%.

Any products that are in production or in transit but have not passed through US customs will be affected. If you are a Lumi customer with current orders affected by the increased tariff rate you will see the tariff as a separate line item on your invoice.

Despite the 25% tariff, our market analysis indicates that the majority of plastic packaging is still more cost effective imported from China, however if you are interested in evaluating other options, request a quote.

December 4, 2018

With recent news of the tariff delays with China, we have delayed the 25% increase on China-sourced Lumi products until the increase goes into effect. Our prices now reflect the most recent tariff increase of 10% from September 2018. When it does, we'll update this post to reflect the change. 

If you ordered at the previously increased tariff rate, how does this impact you? For products imported from China after November 1, 2018, Lumi will refund the 15% tariff difference after your products arrive in the U.S., assuming that the tariff increase doesn’t go into effect before then. 

November 1, 2018

Over the past several months, you’ve probably heard the news about increasing tariffs on Chinese goods. Since August, nearly 6,000 line items in the Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) were hit with a 25% tariff increase, going into effect on January 1, 2019.

In the third round of tariffs on September 24, 2018, nearly every type of packaging and packaging material made the list. 

How the tariffs will impact Lumi pricing

Starting today, we will increase baseline pricing by 25% for the following products to account for the increase in tariffs. This tariff increase will only affect items in your Dashboard if they are made in China.

  • Poly Mailers
  • Poly Bubble Mailers 
  • Paper Bubble Mailers 
  • Laminated Pouches
  • Tote Bags
  • Twisted-Handle Shopping Bags 
  • Garment Bags
  • Kraft Mailers
  • Any other custom-sourced packaging items from China

Why are we applying the tariff increase today if it takes effect on January 1st? With current lead times for manufacturing and sea freight from China, products ordered today will be affected by the tariff increase by the time they enter the US. You can stay on top of the current supply chain status by viewing the Delivery Schedule.

Historically, we have sourced the majority of our flexible plastic packaging (poly mailers, poly bags, laminated pouches) from China because of their highly competitive pricing, matched with their high standards for construction and print quality. We’re working with our manufacturing partners in mainland China to mitigate the U.S. tariffs as much as possible and provide geographic alternatives when we can. 

As always, we’ll keep you updated on any price fluctuations and the drivers behind them.